Ardrossan

About

Completed 1968 as Ardrossan for Shell-Mex & BP. 1975 transferred to Shell UK Coastal Shipping and renamed Shell Craftsman in 1979. 1991 lengthened and re-engined. 1993 renamed Achatina. 1999 sold to Everard & Sons and renamed Aptity. 2001 sold Fairseas Shipping and renamed Bonnie. 2017 sold to Opera Int. Limassol and renamed Bonnie B. 7-2019 scrapped.

Information
Also known as
Shell Craftsman
Achatina
Aptity
Bonnie
Bonnie B
IMO number
6810055
Call sign
GQCC
Construction number
937
Tonnage
2.654 ton
Beam
13m
Length overall
84m
Year of construction
1968
Year of renaming/broken up
2019
Service for Shell
1968 to 1999
Cargo
Class
Flag state
Home port
Manager
Shipyard
Status
Photo(s)

Comments

Sailors

Name Job Period Details
Michael Mcrae deckhand 1968 to 1970

Anecdotes

Date Visitor Anecdote
03/16/2013 - 00:00 Michael Mcrae

This was my first and only ship in the 'Home Trade' I lived in Aberdeen at the time and joined at Hall Russel dockyard did the sea trials as the first trip. Captain was James MacIntyre, came from the Scottish Islands a good man very approachable. The ship was built to supply local Shell - Mex depots around the UK coast and made trips from Grangemouth, Isle of Grain, Shellhaven, Fawley and Milford Haven refineries. Favourite destinations were Great Yarmouth especially during the summer months the night time entertainments were excellent this was in the days when a UK seaside holiday was the highlight of the year, Barry Island in Wales was a similar venue.
Jersey St. Hellier and Guernsey St. Sampsons Port were great destinations the water desalination plant at St. Hellier was a big customer, St. Sampsons was a tidal port so there was usually a whole night stay at least 12hours so there was plenty of time to explore the Island. The cuisine was fabulous tasted better Sherry and Brandy there than in Spain and the seafood was sublime.
The ship was converted by installing a hydraulic boom to enable bunkering operations for deep sea container ships; due to their fast turn around a quick method of refueling them was needed. The Ardrossan could go into terminals alongside or tie up alongside them in estuaries and rivers, where ever they were.
The Ardrossan was my final ship I left the merchant navy in December 1970 with happy memories of the ship and its crew.