Gold Shell (2)

About

Completed 1931 as Gold Shell for Anglo-Saxon. Struck mine and sunk on 19-4-1945, about ten miles off Ostend. Voyage Thameshaven to Antwerp.

Information
IMO number
1162635
Call sign
GRDP
Construction number
697
Tonnage
11.936 ton
Beam
19m
Length overall
142m
Year of construction
1931
Year of renaming/broken up
1945
Service for Shell
1931 to 1945
Cargo
Class
Flag state
Home port
Manager
Shipyard
Status
Photo(s)

Sailors

Name Job Period Details
Frances Medhurst gunner my dad john edward kirby was a gunner who was blown i to the sea when the ship hit a mine.he was rescued by dougie davidson but he never knew dougie got the obe for saving him. dad died on 01.01.2000.
Harry Moore 2 radio officer 1943 to 1944 3rd radio officer
John Joseph Hughes engineer 1943 to 1944
Duncan Mcgregor Gunn 5th engineer, 4th engineer 1943 to 1944
Alan James Bennett steward 1944
Ian Burns chief engineer 1945

Anecdotes

Date Visitor Anecdote
10/02/2017 - 21:16 Duncan Mcgregor Gunn

After a convoy to Canada (Halifax) and US (Baltimore and Galveston) we sailed back to Scotland and off-loaded a cargo of oil. We then went to James Watt docks in Greenock and the tanks were cleaned out and fresh water loaded. We then sat off Oban for 2 days before sailing to Falmouth. We all thought this very strange. We anchored off Falmouth just as evening fell. The next morning, 6th June 1944, we set sail for France. That was when the skipper told us about the invasion we were part of. Naval personnel came on board to man the 4.7 guns. Our task was to sail between the landing beaches dishing out fresh sweet water to the invasion fleet and landing craft. I was one of the trained merchant gunners and had to do my shift manning one of the Oerliken guns. Though we were susceptible to enemy fire we were quite lucky and when the tanks were empty we would return to Southampton to reload. Unfortunately on our last trip back to Southampton we hit a mine during the return. The ship listed to port. However, little damage was done (on this occasion) and we limped into port. At that point I went home for a spot of leave.
(Incidentally, my son is typing this entry for me. At 94 my typing skills are (and never have been) good.)