Tenagodus

About

Completed 1944 as Horse Shoe for U.S.M.C. 1947 purchased by STUK and renamed Tenagodus. 5-1959 laid-up Blackwater. 3-9-1962 arrived Inverkeithing for scrap.

Information
Also known as
Horse Shoe
IMO number
2245772
Call sign
GDLZ
Construction number
563
Tonnage
16.678 ton
Beam
21m
Length overall
169m
Year of construction
1944
Year of renaming/broken up
1962
Service for Shell
1947 to 1962
Cargo
Class
Flag state
Home port
Manager
Shipyard
Status
Photo(s)

Comments

Sailors

Anecdotes

Date Visitor Anecdote
10/04/2012 - 23:52 James Pemberton

I was the senior on watch in the engineroom on the 12 to 4pm watch on the 25th December 1954 having just had my xmas lunch. When the bridge rang down emergency stop full astern.We thought it was a prank from the bridge at first but on checking, found out that there was a man overboard.It was young Johnny Mellish who had gone over the side.We searched for several hours but did not find him.Even now, Every Xmas at lunch time I still say a pray for him

11/29/2010 - 11:39 Glyn Howell

I joined the Tenagodus as a deck apprentice on the 13th February 1954 along with Dave Richardson and Arthur (Johnny) Mellish, who was the senior apprentice. I think that it was most likely in Cardiff. The year passed very well and eventually we arrived at Geelong/Melbourne in the week leading up to Christmas. At one time we thought that we would be in port on Christmas Day but it was not to be and we sailed on Christmas Morning. Several AB's had jumped ship, a fairly usual occurrence in Australia, which meant the apprentices were put on "wheel watch".

Both Dave and myself had gone into lunch, whilst Johnny was on first wheel, and at about 1220 we all heard three long blasts on the whistle. This is such an unusual event that all hands in the saloon just looked at one another, until the realisation set in. We tumbled out on deck and Dave and I went straight to the bridge to find out that Johnny had felt sick and had leant over the port wing of the bridge, which in T2's are quite low. The roll of the sea's in the Australian Bight did the rest. WE manned the lifeboat, but although we saw him reach the lifebelt by the time we got to it he was not to be found. Although several other apprentices joined Dave and I did not leave until the 1st of July 1955.

It wass an event that always seem to crop up in my mind evry Christmas Day when I carve the Turkey, and remember the annual joke of the Officers Steward as he shouts through the serving hatch, "the Captain wants stuffing", all so very innocent in those days. Glyn Howell

12/06/2009 - 19:34 Calvin Lucas

I caught the Horseshoe out of Mobile ,Ala. in 1944 June. I sailed aboard her until

end of Jan. 1945' We made 5 trips across the NORTH atlantic and then sailed to pacific arriving in Leyete in Dec. 1944. We never were in port in North Atlantic

over two days. Eleven days in convey in a crossing. We recieved the bronze star

in Leyete. We had 135 air alerts in 38 days. I was in the Navy Armed Guard. I caught one other ship and went to Chjle for a load of nitrate. Discharged when war was over I'm glad to learn any info. about Horseshoe. Calvin Lucas

12/06/2009 - 19:34 Calvin Lucas

I caught the Horseshoe out of Mobile ,Ala. in 1944 June. I sailed aboard her until

end of Jan. 1945' We made 5 trips across the NORTH atlantic and then sailed to pacific arriving in Leyete in Dec. 1944. We never were in port in North Atlantic

over two days. Eleven days in convey in a crossing. We recieved the bronze star

in Leyete. We had 135 air alerts in 38 days. I was in the Navy Armed Guard. I caught one other ship and went to Chjle for a load of nitrate. Discharged when war was over I'm glad to learn any info. about Horseshoe. Calvin Lucas